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Tara’s Clarifying Salt Scrub

One of the easiest products to make in the kitchen, yet one of the most commonly bought off the shelves of pharmacies and beauty retailers (at a great expense) are salt or sugar scrubs.

I adore the feeling of silky-soft skin, unblocked pores and a good exfoliation, and a salt-based scrub is by far your best option to help clarify and tone your skin.

This delicious jar full is suitable for body, hands, feet and face.

Lavender Fields
15 drops of lavender

Paris Perfume
10 drops ylang ylang
6 drops lavender
4 drops cedarwood

Fresh Breeze
10 drops grapefruit
6 drops lemongrass
4 drops frankincense

Spiced
5 drops ginger
5 drops frankincense
5 drops lavender

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DIY Protector™ Soap

  1. Melt soap base in the microwave or on the stove top.
  2. Add 30 drops Protector™ blend essential oil
  3. Stir thoroughly and pour into soap molds.
  4. Add dried herbs or flowers (optional).
  5. Wait 1 hour. Remove from mold.

Go wash your hands already!
Or gift your homemade soap and share the love—not the germs.

ADDITIONAL FRESH & FRAGRANT IDEAS FOR PROTECTIVE RECIPES

Lavender Fields
30 drops of lavender

Paris Perfume
15 drops ylang ylang
9 drops lavender
6 drops cedarwood

Fresh Breeze
15 drops grapefruit
9 drops lemongrass
6 drops frankincense

Spiced
10 drops ginger
10 drops frankincense
10 drops lavender

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Homemade Muscle Rub

Helps decrease inflammation and swelling, loosen tight muscles & soothe away pain. Cover with hot wash cloth after applying for that extra ahhhh!

Ingredients:

 

Directions:

  1. Add coconut oil and beeswax to jar. Place jar in a saucepan with 2 inches of water over medium low heat. Stir to melt/combine.
  2. Cool slightly before adding essential oil. Mix well.
  3. Allow to set in jar or pour mixture into metal tins or storage containers to share with friends and family.
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Essential Oil Perfume

The Oxford Dictionaries defines “perfume” as “a fragrant liquid typically made from essential oils extracted from flowers and spices”.

Egyptians were responsible for the origin of perfume. They utilized scents in everything from religious ceremonies to burial preparations and even daily wear. They created ointments and balms with essential oils mixed in to provide scent.

Unfortunately today according to The Environmental Working Group (EWG) “while many popular perfumes, colognes and body sprays contain trace amounts of natural essences, they also typically contain a dozen or more potentially hazardous synthetic chemicals. To protect trade secrets, makers are allowed to withhold fragrance ingredients”.

A DIY essential oil perfume will have exactly the ingredients you choose plus by using therapeutic grade essential oils, you will benefit from the properties associated with each oil.

Traditionally, perfume is made by layering scents according to how volatile the oils are (how easily they evaporate). Top notes evaporate quickly—they are the first scent you smell in a perfume.  Middle or heart notes form the main body of a perfume. Base notes are fixatives—they hold and blend the other ingredients, and they stay on the skin the longest, so you always smell them in combination with the other aromas of the perfume.

Top notes: Sweet orange, Lemongrass, Peppermint, Bergamot, Basil, Anise

Middle notes: Geranium, Jasmine, Lavender, Neroli, Rose, Rosemary, Pine

Base notes: Sandalwood, Frankincense, Ylang Ylang, Cedarwood, Myrrh, Vetiver

Try starting with 5-6 essential oils. Here are some examples:

  • Floral blend: Bergamot, Anise, Geranium, Jasmine, Sandalwood.
  • Green & Herbaceous Blend: Basil, Peppermint, Rosemary, Pine, Vetiver.

There is no steadfast rule regarding percentages of each note. I tend to like base notes so I start with our Meditation Blend (a lot of base) and add florals.

Don’t be afraid to experiment, remember it’s personal – use oils that you love!

Recommended for mixing, storing and applying essential oil blends: Pure Acres Farm Roll-on Bottles

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Essential Oils for Your Horse

Teresa spends a lot of time at the barn with her favorite horse, Fargo. She protects both herself and Fargo from pesky insects with Lemongrass essential oil.

After every shower Teresa adds a couple drops of Lemongrass essential oil to her body lotion before applying. For Fargo, she places a couple drops in her hand and rubs on his face – avoiding his eyes. He loves the smell and it works like a charm.

For an easy fly spray to use at the barn: add 1 teaspoon of Lemongrass essential oil to 32 oz spray bottle and fill with water. Will enhance, not damage your horses coat.

When washing Fargo’s saddle pads, blankets and wraps, Teresa adds Tea Tree essential oil to the wash to help clean and disinfect. Add 8-15 drops essential oil per cap of unscented liquid detergent or 3-5 drops to the rinse cycle.

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Essential Oils & Cognitive Performance

A hugely underrated member of the five senses, your sense of smell has a powerful effect on your brain’s many functions.

A combined study at the University of Cincinnati and Catholic University of America showed that smelling Peppermint essential oil enhanced alertness, focus, and concentration and according to a British study published in the International Journal of Neuroscience, inhaling Lavender essential oil before doing math problems helped subjects complete the problems faster and more accurately than the control group.

Here is a list of some common essential oils and how they can help:

Inhalation methods are usually the easiest. Use in a diffuser to spread the scent through your room, classroom or office, or you can also add a few drops on a tissue or cotton ball and sniff when needed.

But be sure to use 100% Therapeutic Grade essential oils and oil blends. The better the quality, the better your results will be!

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Simple Lemongrass Bug Repellent

It’s June and the bugs have arrived with the warm weather. Try using this tried and true plant-based ingredient to protect you and your family.

Conventional bug repellants like DEET are insecticides based on chemicals used in warfare, and have been linked to nervous system disorders as well as seizures. (EPA). When you use essential oils, what you’re using is the life force of the plant, which is very powerful.

Our skin is the largest organ of our body and absorbs much of what we apply, so using less toxic ingredients seems like a good choice.

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